Black Eyed Pea & Raw Mango Salad

IMG_0246

We’ve moved into May and it’s not getting any cooler. And my earnestness to cook as little as humanly possible is not slowing down either.

As you may have inferred from the last few posts, summer in my kitchen = salad. I sometimes eat leftover salad for breakfast, with a cold hard-boiled egg sliced in. The great thing about salads is that if they if greens aren’t the core ingredient, chances are, they’ll keep longer. Which is why I use a lot of dried beans and legumes as a base for salad. Chickpeas are great, and rajma or kidney beans can also be used to make a great salad- especially if you want to switch up your routine from regular rajma-chawal.

Lobia or black eyed peas are as good a dried bean as any to make a salad. I usually cook them rajma-style, putting everything- the lobia, spices, tomatoes, et al- into the pressure cooker and letting it whistle away for a while, and then eating the curry with rice or roti.

But then that can get boring.

So I took it upon myself to make lobia fun and colourful! The peas are quite pretty to look at on their own- what with their little black eyes and creamy skin- and they are a solid structure for a filling salad.

Of course, when you begin to type black eyed peas into Google, you will invariably end up being directed to the band, not the legume. So after I Googled black eyed pea recipes, I found my way, as I usually do, to Food52. Sometimes I wonder why I even bother Googling when I can just search straight on Food52. An article for One Pot Of Black Eyed Peas, 5 Dinners linked me up with 101 Cookbooks. If there’s a tastier way to eat a whole grain, legume, leaf or egg, then Heidi Swanson has been there, done that.

Swanson paired her cooked beans with curry powder, red onions, lentils and ginger- so some spice and sharpness to balance the creamy cooked beans.

I decided to make it a little more tropical, adding raw mango or kairi, and some cucumbers and red onions. I like adding to kairi salads- it adds a nice bite and tartness and sharpness that lends an element of surprise 🙂 I wanted the flavours to be reminiscent of som tam, but without any soy or fish sauce. I stuck to a coconut-chilli-lime dressing and lots of fresh mint, cilantro and crushed toasted peanuts, for a little Thai flavour note.

 BLACK-EYED PEA & RAW MANGO SALAD

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups cooked and drained black-eyed peas
  • 1/2 cup cubed raw mango
  • 1 medium cucumber, diced
  • 1 medium onion, sliced thinly
  • A handful each of cilantro and fresh mint leaves, roughly torn
  • 1/4 cup crushed toasted peanuts

For The Dressing

  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 4 tbsp  lime juice
  • 1-2 tbsp honey/brown sugar/coconut sugar, depending on how sweet you like things
  • 1-2 tsp chilli flakes
  • Salt to taste

METHOD

  • Put all the salad ingredients in  large bowl and toss well to combine.
  • Whisk together all the dressing ingredients in a separate bowl until evenly incorporated.
  • Pour dressing over the salad and serve chilled.
Advertisements

Beetroot Gazpacho

As you may have inferred from my last few posts- it is getting uncomfortably warm in these parts. Just really, really still, dry heat; the kind that drains you and makes you want to jump into a pool any chance you get. Hence, I feel the need to consume lots of coconut water and lime juice and prepare meals which are light on the stomach and cold on the tongue.

Salads are great, and I do love them- but the heat called for something really, really  cold; and a chilled soup seemed like a better option. Plus, sometimes it’s nice to take the easy route and make a blender do a bulk of the work. 😀

I’ve never made a gazpacho before, even though I’ve watched it being made on television, listened to podcasts outlining the perfect gazpacho, and saved numerous recipes to my Evernote. I haven’t attempted any of those, so in some ways, this is my “gateway” gazpacho.

IMG_0297

I decided to make this because I didn’t have any bread for a regular gazpacho, but I had a pair of beets. I always have beets in my fridge. You’d think that the one constant ingredient in my fridge would be eggs or bread or limes or herbs, but in my case, it’s beets. I buy them each week, so there’s always a spare beet nestled somewhere in the crisper, patiently waiting it’s turn as the kale, spinach, mushrooms and cherry tomatoes make their way to our plates first.

When it comes to vegetables that are always stocked in my kitchen, the list looks something like this:

  • Potatoes
  • Onions
  • Tomatoes
  • Cucumbers
  • Beets

Potatoes-onions-tomatoes are a must in any Indian kitchen. My son loves cucumbers and eats a plateful of sliced cucumbers everyday with salt and pepper, so there must always be a handful in the crisper. And beetroots are great because they stay well (they don’t seem to spoil as easily as other vegetables,) plus, they are so cheap year-round. And  they are so, so good for you! I can make them Kerala-style, as a thoran or pachadi; I can roast them whole, boil them and pour some brown butter over for a warm salad- beets are a very versatile vegetable. And great for juicing, too!

So, continuing with my no-cook theme, I zoned in on the beetroot gazpacho recipe from Rachel Allen’s Easy Meals. Except there was some cooking involved- I parboiled the beetroot. My blender is a regular one, not a Vitamix, and I don’t own a food processor either, so I wasn’t sure how well raw beets would break down. Other than the boiling, all you do is blitz the stuff you see above in a food processor or blender and push it through a sieve. I swapped the sherry vinegar in the original recipe for balsamic- because that’s what I had. And since the soup is a deep purple anyway, the balsamic doesn’t discolour it, just adds a really nice depth of flavour.This soup is refreshing with a nice, bright flavour- no single ingredient overpowers, it all comes together to make a nice, mellow cool spoonful.

I finished mine with a touch more acid- some lemon- and a pinch of pink Himalayan salt, because I got a phancy little box with assorted salts. And why not add some pink on top of purple?

IMG_0228

BEETROOT GAZPACHO (Adapted from Rachel Allen’s Easy Meals)

INGREDIENTS

  • 300 g beetroot
  • 500 g cherry tomatoes
  • 100 g cucumber, skin removed and roughly chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, deseeded and roughly chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, grated or minced
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2-4 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • A squeeze of lime
  • Salt and freshly cracked pepper to taste

METHOD

  • Peel the beetroot and plunge into boiling water. Cook for a few minutes until tender; a knife should be able to go through easily but not all the way through.
  • Allow the beetroot to cool, then roughly chop it.
  • Combine the beetroot, cucumber, red pepper, cherry tomatoes and garlic in a food processor or blender and blitz for a few minutes until smooth. Add a little cold water if necessary to make it all come together. (I had to as my blender isn’t very powerful.)
  • Pour the puree through a sieve set atop a large bowl. Press down against the mixture with the back of a spoon to get all the liquid through.
  • Stir in the olive oil, balsamic vinegar and season with salt and pepper. Serve chilled, with a squeeze of lime and a sprinkling of salt and pepper on top.

A Simple Summer Chickpea Salad

It’s getting hot in Pune. Unbearably hot. The kind of hot that makes heavy eating, and standing over the stove for too long, a real chore.

I tend to feel sluggish in the warmer months if I eat heavy foods and spicy curries- so chicken curry and sambhar are replaced with pachadi and curd rice. And on many days, we eat salad.

What I love about salads are that they’re pretty forgiving creatures, as long as you have an open mind. There are no must-have or can’t-use ingredients. You can use all kinds of vegetables & herbs, proteins & carbohydrates, nuts & grains to create a really filling, tasty meal-in-a-bowl. Fattoush and panzanella make use of bread, som tam and the Waldorf make use of fruits and nuts, while a classic caeser and nicoise put eggs and fish to good (and delicious!) use.

When I make my salads as a meal, I need to have some form of protein in it. Unfortunately, I am neither Rachel Allen nor Nigella Lawson, so I rarely never have leftover meat from a Sunday roast in the form or chicken strips and beef shreds. So my protein of choice is either canned tuna or kabuli chana, which is a staple in most Indian pantries.

The only cooking this salad requires is boiling the chickpeas- but you are more than welcome to use canned chickpeas. I often pressure-cook a batch of chickpeas (two cups) on Sunday and store them in the fridge for salad or hummus during the week.

So this salad came together on a weekday when it was too hot to cook. It’s simple, and light on the stomach but still keeps you sated. I like adding some kind of nut or seed to my salads this days- they add a lovely bite and crunch, plus they are really good for you. If I’m using almonds, I just soak them and use them raw. With peanuts, I like to toast them lightly in their skin and crush them before adding in. And watermelon and sesame seeds I just sprinkle over the top as they are; though toasting them would be a nice touch.

SUMMER CHICKPEA SALAD

INGREDIENTS

For The Dressing

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • Garlic salt, celery salt or store-bought Italian seasoning, 1 teaspoon
  • A pinch of sugar
  • Salt & pepper to taste

For The Salad

  • 1 cup cooked chickpeas, drained
  • 2 medium cucumbers, chopped
  •  8-10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 large red onion, sliced into half moons
  • A fistful each of chopped mint and coriander (optional)
  • A fistful of pumpkin seeds, watermelon seeds, sunflower seeds or any seeds of your choice. You could also use some soaked raw almonds. (This is also optional.)

METHOD

  • To make the dressing, whisk all the ingredients together in a bowl until evenly combined. Adjust for salt-sweetness-acidity as per your liking, and set aside.
  • For the salad, add all the ingredients to a large bowl and mix well. (Use your hands, use tongs, use your kids toy spade, it doesn’t matter!)
  • Pour the dressing over the salad, toss well again and serve.